dipping and stripping

arthuy

Well-Known Member
#1
I have been thinking about using these guys before but was wondering if anyone has used them.

Paint Stripping, Rust and Underseal Removal for Cars and Industry by Surface Processing Limited

I have had some spider legs creeping under the paint on my p5 so thought this might be the way to get rid of it properly but also have some p6 wings that have been stripped and now have surface rust which will be a paint to clean up.

They have a P6 on their site so was looking for a first hand account.

Colin
 

corazon

Well-Known Member
#2
Looks nice and thorough, plus you don't have to get dirty, buy an air fed mask and second compressor, spend days of your life with power tools etc etc.
It also ends up with a coat of epoxy which is great. I didn't see any guide prices, is that because it's rather expensive?
Jim
 

colnerov

Well-Known Member
#3
Hi, I've no personal experience but having said that the company had a reputation for taking ages to getting around to actually dipping the car and informing you it was done. The process can be quite brutal in that can leave parts of the car very frilly but I suppose that's the point to find and get rid of the rust. There was a car on another forum that was done, repaired and painted, then sometime later some parts had to be repaired again. In particular door bottom corners where there're folded joints and the acid had slowly soaked into the compacted rust, not been drained out and carried on working and erupted again later, whether it was the rust or the acid was not clear. Pricing can soon start running away and needs to be sorted before because the epoxy primer is an additional cost, which you could well be scurfing of to do repairs. Their handling of the cars before and after is not particularly gentle and there has been damage reported.

I'm not intending this post to appear so negative. The company may well have cleaned up their act and be improved. Just some things to consider.

I like to do restorations myself and I'm not happy with the car being out of my control for things like this.

Colin
 

corazon

Well-Known Member
#4
Pricing can soon start running away and needs to be sorted before because the epoxy primer is an additional cost, which you could well be scurfing of to do repairs.

I like to do restorations myself and I'm not happy with the car being out of my control for things like this.

Colin
I know what you mean, ideally I try to do everything in house. But for some owners this sort of thing makes sense if they don't have the tooling, space, experience or time.

Yeah and the whole point of a tough coat of epoxy is that it's hard to damage, removing a lot of it would be a pain but I suppose their acid is strong enough to do it, at an additional fee?

Jim
 
#5
i also considered dipping my P5B Coupe but heard identical storey's like Colin mentioned that acid was left behind in seams and that the shell started rusting after a few month. I choose to remove all the paint with paint stripper and then get everything shot blasted. It is good to remove the paint before the shotblasting to make sure there is no filler underneath the paint. You should avoid long periods of blasting on 1 spot. After the shell has been painted i will inject all hollow rooms with some kind of wax. It is a lot of work but it prevents the disappointment of rust creeping out the seams after a few month.
Make sure you choose a shotblasting compagne that has dealed with shot blasting cars before as the car can be easily ruined when too much pressure is used






Peter
 

mtb_tuli

Active Member
#6
The treatment with base requires a completely stripped body shell and only metal parts, no aluminium.
For "normal" classic cars it is simply too expensive. Rust treatment after the base bath and water neutralizing requires a 2nd treatment with phosphoric acid, but be prepared to look into more or less big holes :D
Removing paint from body sections like wings can be done by companies with a proper experience using dry ice and special surface gentle blast materials. Again, also this is not cheap.
The Americans do it the simple way. Order a water-blast company, they come with a truck, you pay 1000 bucks and in 1-2 hours your paint is removed (some other minor parts also...). Your aluminim bonnets will look a little bit different then.
 

arthuy

Well-Known Member
#7
So what alternatives are there.

I am only looking to do the wings and doors, I have surface rust on wings that have been previously stripped to bare metal.

Will try and post a picture.
 

arthuy

Well-Known Member
#9
The underseal is still on the panels.

The paint was removed and they were left for years. My worry is that if I clean them up and then years later a little but breaks through and ruins the paint.

Reminds me of the SD1 panels athe Rimmer bros repatriated from india years ago. Locals sat with wire wool cleaning them up.








 

quattro

Administrator
Staff member
#10
Hi Arthuy

I used one of these companies (won't name them) to dip all of my panels, 4 x wings, 4 doors, sills covers, both scuttles and valances.

They did a very good job and they looked amazing when I got them back, but when I dropped them off to Clive Annable to put the paint on, he cut out the front wing stress panel to find rust behind it. He also removes a corner of a door to repair it and found this.



Their advertising blurb said it would get every bit of rust out, even from areas like these.

Richard
 

mtb_tuli

Active Member
#12
For your panels, it's easy. Look for a company, which offers dry-ice blasting (for removal of the underseal) and all the range of blasting and is familiar with car restoration. These companies offer at least 8, 9 methods of blasting, which fit to each requirement.
For the rusty parts it's then limited to 4, 5 abrasive methods, but you will find your panels after it in a great condition.
Do not go to a company, which is only offering sand-blasting or mostly working in the non-automotive sector.
I.e., you can test them with your carbs. If it's a company, which is operating in the car restoration sector, they can offer you this. With simple abrasive type blasting it is not possible.
I'm sorry, the company here, where I'm very satisfied with, sits in Germany, but have a look on this site, to give you an impression, what I mean
www.eisclean.de
 

colnerov

Well-Known Member
#13
Hi Arthuy

I used one of these companies (won't name them) to dip all of my panels, 4 x wings, 4 doors, sills covers, both scuttles and valances.

They did a very good job and they looked amazing when I got them back, but when I dropped them off to Clive Annable to put the paint on, he cut out the front wing stress panel to find rust behind it. He also removes a corner of a door to repair it and found this.



Their advertising blurb said it would get every bit of rust out, even from areas like these.

Richard
Hi, To be fair I can't think of any other process that is going to deal with corrosion in that location other than what's been done ie. open it up.

Colin
 
#14
Having had my wings and front valence blasted earlier this year, I don't think I'd recommend it. It's not that the guy didn't do a good job, he really did, but the surface finish was so rough, I spent ages sanding them down. The bodyshop guy then spent just as long again, I think, to get the finish spot on.

You may find that sanding the panels down with a 120-180 grit paper is the best bet, followed up with a rust converter to stop them going rusty again.
 

quattro

Administrator
Staff member
#15
Hi, To be fair I can't think of any other process that is going to deal with corrosion in that location other than what's been done ie. open it up.

Colin
Totally agree, but the company in question said quite clearly that their special would get it all out, every single bit of it to a molecular level, and that it would never rust again, ever.

I did think they were exaggerating a bit ;)
 
#16
I can be rather more positive about the SPL process than some of the posts above. I had my 3500S base unit and panels chemically stripped, cleaned and electrophoretically (E-coat) primed back in 2012. I found their service and process to be excellent, and would have no hesitation in recommending it - BUT as Colin says, you have to apply some of the laws of physics to your expectations. At no point did they guarantee to me that all rust would be removed from folded edges like door skin edge seams, and spot welded lap joints in panels. It would be impossible to get their solutions into such places without opening up the seams slightly, which to be fair I did with a small flat chisel in such areas where I could see rust had formed.

I did an awful lot of research into the process before I committed to it, including a visit to their works. It is not a simple acid dip, the shells and panels go through a multi stage immersion process which removes different elements at different stages. The later stages remove rust with no erosion of the parent steel, and the final stage is a neutralising bath which will deal with any corrosive residue left behind, and leave the surface clean enough to paint. The primer E-coat is an optional additional process and is not applied at their site, but is only available through them. My P6 base unit and panels were sent to an MoD contractor in Mildenhall to be done, but I know that facility has since closed. The last shells I have had done were E-coated at GKN on the Land Rover chassis line in Shropshire. It is worth remembering that the E-coat process also involves eight immersion tanks, six to remove all possible contaminants, the last two being full of the special PPG primer containing £450'000 of the stuff, according to the site manager, so they have to be absolutely sure that anything going into it is free from any contamination.

It's worth mentioning that SPL recommend that a shell is fully cleaned by them first, then returned to you for repair, and then back to them to be cleaned again and E-coated. This is ideal as once the shell is clean all rusty areas can be clearly seen, and the steel is so clean it welds like brand new sheet. In my case, I couldn't afford the extra cost, so opted to repair my base unit first, then have it stripped, cleaned and E-coated in one hit, which with the exception of some totally unexpected perforation in the boot floor, worked out well for me.

As I said, I have personally found them to be very proffesional in what they do. There is no other process which even comes close to theirs for comprehensively removing rust and other contaminants from difficult to access areas like inside box sections, and protecting these areas again afterwards. I would say it's as close to a factory new finish as can be achieved today on an old body shell. I had heard all the stories referred to above, like handling damage and shells hanging about their site for ages, but I didn't see any of that. My P6 base unit was handled very carefully, and compared to some of the exotica they had in, was of very low comparable value. There is quite a long waiting list for their process, it was about five months when I last used them on another project last year, and once shells are booked in they are generally turned around in about two weeks. They do not have the capacity to store shells for long due to the amount of them that they are processing at one given time, so only give a few days grace for collection when completed.

If anyone is interested I will dig out the photos of my P6 base unit when it was done.
 
#18
Here are some - I keep meaning to upload the base unit repair photos to the forum (months of work!), but never seem to get around to it.
All the replacement panels were genuine Rover, or exact hand made copies. I found out very early on that the extra cost of genuine panels is rewarded in the quality of fit!.

P6001.JPG P6002.JPG P6003.JPG P6004.JPG P6005.JPG P6006.JPG
 
Top