good bye Wheeler dealers says Ed china!!!

arthuy

Well-Known Member
#1

Not a dedicated fan but like Ed and his magic hammer.

Show goes on with Ant Ansted with less garage to save money.....
 

sdibbers

Well-Known Member
#2
Sort of Surprised that Ant is with them. He came across as a careful restorer in For the Love of Cars. Ed I respect, but wheeler dealers always felt like they were flipping cars instead of really restoring cars.
 
#4
Sad news, tea time viewing will not be the same

Having said that I do like Ant Anstead but is he too much of a perfectionist for Wheeler Dealers?

See how it goes I guess
 
#5
Petty, it was the only show that realy showed some technical stuff.
Not all the american shows wich futere a car that apaers to grow by its self.

How i must say, by meeting Chip Foose once personaly i must say i think that man is great, he is realy doing lots off the work himself.
When i met him 2 years ago, he was working in his own shop on a sunday working on one of his projects.

Petty that Wheeler dealers will be one like al the others.

:(:(:(:(:(:(:(
 

cobraboy

Well-Known Member
#6
For the less informed.
Anstead has been around for some time, he made Aston DBR1 recreations for a while but they were so shonky that he gave them up after the owners started to complain.
He then started cutting up Aston DB7's to make into DB4 GT replicas and Aston got really miffed at this and shut him down, not before a substantial sum of money disappeared from his business leaving partners somewhat miffed and his business Evanta in insolvency.
He built a Jaguar xj 13 replica in which the owner unfortunately died.
I have seen his careful workmanship at first hand and wont be riding in anything he has had a hand in.
TV personality and real life are not the same I am afraid.

An Aston Martin DBR2 - for just £35,000
 

quattro

Administrator
Staff member
#7
I did like wheeler dealers but to be honest, I didn't actually believe that Ed was doing the work. I have never once been under a classic car, loosened a ball joint nut, then spun it off with my fingers, then a quick tap and the taper drops out.

My endeavours have always been, wire brush, then penetrating spray. Underneath and break off the seized, rusty split pin, then have to drill it out. Then with a dirty great spanner and hammer, beat the nut loose, then create some new muscle tissue undoing the rest of it. Then a quick tap with a toffee hammer like Ed does, then a not so quick tap with two large hammers, then get a taper breaker on it and do it up tighter than a fishes gearbox, and hit it really hard several times. Then heat it up,..... well, you get the picture. Still enjoyed the show though :)
 
#8
I did like wheeler dealers but to be honest, I didn't actually believe that Ed was doing the work. I have never once been under a classic car, loosened a ball joint nut, then spun it off with my fingers, then a quick tap and the taper drops out.

My endeavours have always been, wire brush, then penetrating spray. Underneath and break off the seized, rusty split pin, then have to drill it out. Then with a dirty great spanner and hammer, beat the nut loose, then create some new muscle tissue undoing the rest of it. Then a quick tap with a toffee hammer like Ed does, then a not so quick tap with two large hammers, then get a taper breaker on it and do it up tighter than a fishes gearbox, and hit it really hard several times. Then heat it up,..... well, you get the picture. Still enjoyed the show though :)
I agree with that, but it was stil better then all the other shows where they didn't even use a spanner, or show you how to undo the taper.
everything fals magicly apart without any tools.
 

harveyp6

Well-Known Member
#10
For the less informed.
Anstead has been around for some time, he made Aston DBR1 recreations for a while but they were so shonky that he gave them up after the owners started to complain.
He then started cutting up Aston DB7's to make into DB4 GT replicas and Aston got really miffed at this and shut him down, not before a substantial sum of money disappeared from his business leaving partners somewhat miffed and his business Evanta in insolvency.
He built a Jaguar xj 13 replica in which the owner unfortunately died.
I have seen his careful workmanship at first hand and wont be riding in anything he has had a hand in.
TV personality and real life are not the same I am afraid.

An Aston Martin DBR2 - for just £35,000

If all the above is correct, (and I have no reason to think otherwise) then it confirms what I thought, but had nothing other than watching the way he worked on TV to back it up.

As for Ed, although I may have made remarks on occasion about him looking "like a cow with a gun" in the way he approached some jobs, and the way everything just neatly came apart (as mentioned elsewhere) he always seemed a nice enough bloke, and I admire him for having the integrity to tell Discovery where to shove it..... Good luck to him with his future projects.

All those programmes are "made for TV" and nothing like working on cars in the real world.
 
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#11
I used to like the early shows of Wheeler Dealers when they seemed to show more of the mechanical side of things, and were on small budgets. Lost its charm when they moved to the States.
 
#12
watched both gentlemen in both shows. even saw Ed China and Mike Brewster at NEC show last year. Ant comes across as knowing his stuff too. aware TV programs are very far from real world. amazing that 'parts' can be so easily sourced for low sums etc and work seems to progress to a deadline looming but aha ... they always achieve timing or a sale etc
the wheeler dealers for example ignores all labour costs which in nearly all cases would have had them making a loss! however overall. we do get to see bits of other cars in different stages of life. before and after so many parts where actually ceiling a spanner or grinder and a few explanation when stripping and why it didn't work.. are what of rme made it all watchable.
 
#13
Sad to see Ed leave, I thought WD was a better show in its low budget form, I thought it spoke better to home restorers and amateur engineers. I’m not really a fan of slick presentation or style. It may be just me, but in the final Mike/Ed shows there were moments when I thought I could detect just a trace of less than friendly feeling between them?
 

PeterZRH

Well-Known Member
#14
I think the US move kills most of the interest for me. It became apparent even in the last series with Ed. The vintage Cadillac was potentially very interesting but the story wasn't even concluded, it was a case of run out of time, oh well, let's shove what we've recorded together and air it anyway. You can see the tension and frustration rising during the series.
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
#15
Sad to see Ed leave, I thought WD was a better show in its low budget form, I thought it spoke better to home restorers and amateur engineers. I’m not really a fan of slick presentation or style. It may be just me, but in the final Mike/Ed shows there were moments when I thought I could detect just a trace of less than friendly feeling between them?
I wondered if something was 'up' when Mike started to do some of the work himself when Ed wasn't around.

I hope Ed returns in a classic capacity soon; I haven't seen anything in the last 6 months that suggests anything is in the offing.
 
#16
I wondered if something was 'up' when Mike started to do some of the work himself when Ed wasn't around.

I hope Ed returns in a classic capacity soon; I haven't seen anything in the last 6 months that suggests anything is in the offing.
Let’s hope so, he comes across as a nice guy and has a good screen presence without forced buffoonery, showmanship or affectation. Good luck Ed.
 

arthuy

Well-Known Member
#17
The wheeler dealers team have been busy.

They picked up a Volvo 480 and sold it on ebay but the buyer had to agree to interviews etc
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
#18
OK guys, now that 2 episodes of the 'New' Wheeler Dealers have been aired on Sky, what do those of you that have seen it actually think? o_O
 

Phil Robson

Well-Known Member
#20
So far I think it’s almost as good as before...

The only downside is that it’s based in California now, so doesn’t showcase British workshops & the like any more.

No rust of course, which can torpedo a car’s viability!
 
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