series 2 Kienzle clock repair.

#1
hi there,
I have a spare Kienzle clock which is also not working.
Have read the other posts on repairs so had a look at mine.
In pat180269 post the offending bit is the contact , same with mine.
so this is what I have found. In the picture the copper contact at the top has a hole in the center.
does this have to be solered to the point lower down?
Peter
 

Attachments

Hobby

Active Member
#4
Solder which melts at a lower temperature than normal solder, typically 70/100' although there are other variations. Normally you are looking at 180' plus. Us Railway Modellers use it to put together whitemetal kits which would melt if we used the normal stuff. I also use it to make small scale brass kits. It's best used with a liquid flux.
 
Last edited:

Tom W

Active Member
#5
I fixed mine without adding any new solder as I wasn’t sure exactly what the melting point of the original was. If you can’t do that, best to start with the lowest melt and workup if it keeps fusing.
 
#6
Solder which melts at a lower temperature than normal solder, typically 70/100' although there are other variations. Normally you are looking at 180' plus. Us Railway Modellers use it to put together whitemetal kits which would melt if we used the normal stuff. I also use it to make small scale brass kits. It's best used with a liquid flux.
the question is why did it melt in the first place?
there seems to be solder still on the lower half, if I can get in there with a soldering iron, I will try using that first.
Peter
 

ghce

Well-Known Member
#7
the question is why did it melt in the first place?
there seems to be solder still on the lower half, if I can get in there with a soldering iron, I will try using that first.
Peter
The solenoid contacts can fuse together due to sparking and poor contact resistance causing the coil to over heat as it gets stuck permanently on ( very common on this sort of car clock) so it pays to re-burnish the solenoid contacts from time to time.

Graeme
 
#9
Just hold the contacts together and touch briefly with a low power soldering iron (15 watt or so) and that should re-connect them.
after looking at mine, I was wondering how to hold the copper bit to the lower solder blob bit, cant get small pliers in to grip it, dont want to disassemble it either. Must explore some more!
Peter
 
#10
an up date: the parts to be repaired are to small to handle, cant get in to hold bits to be soldered, so the clock is destined to the
parts bin....I never throw things away..:cool:
Peter
 
Last edited:

Hobby

Active Member
#11
I got told by one of the local members that there was a guy in Wolverhampton who took out the gubbins in the back and replaced it with a modern electric clock mechanism, using the front face to keep it looking original. That may be an option?
 
Top